Demystifying the World of In-Cell, On-Cell, and OGS Touch screen

In-Cell, On-Cell, and OGS Touch Screen Technologies

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll explore the intricacies of in-cell, on-cell, and OGS (One Glass Solution) touch screen technologies, shedding light on their distinct characteristics, manufacturing processes, and potential applications.

In-Cell Touch Screen

In-cell touch screen technology represents the pinnacle of touch panel integration, where the touch sensor function is embedded directly into the liquid crystal pixels of the display panel. This innovative approach eliminates the need for a separate touch panel layer, resulting in a thinner and lighter overall display assembly. By fusing the touch functionality with the display panel, in-cell touchscreens offer superior optical performance, enhanced readability, and improved sunlight visibility.

However, the manufacturing process for in-cell touch screens is highly complex and demanding, often requiring specialized touch ICs (Integrated Circuits) to ensure accurate touch sensing and noise reduction. Additionally, the yield rates for in-cell touchscreens can be lower compared to other technologies, contributing to higher production costs. Nonetheless, the benefits of in-cell touchscreens, such as their sleek form factor and exceptional display quality, have made them a popular choice for high-end smartphones and tablets.

On-Cell Touch Screen

On-cell touch screen technology strikes a balance between integration and manufacturing complexity. In this approach, the touch sensor is embedded between the color filter substrate and the polarizer of the display panel, effectively equipping the touch functionality directly onto the LCD panel. While not as seamlessly integrated as in-cell touchscreens, on-cell technology offers a more streamlined solution compared to traditional air bonding methods.

One of the key advantages of on-cell touch screens is their relatively easier manufacturing process, which can translate into higher yield rates and lower production costs compared to in-cell touchscreens. However, on-cell touchscreens may still exhibit some thickness and color uniformity issues, although advancements in manufacturing techniques have significantly improved these aspects over time.

OGS (One Glass Solution) Touch Screen

OGS touch screen technology, also known as TOL (Touch on Lens), represents a unique approach to integrating touch functionality directly onto the protective cover glass. In this method, the conductive layer (typically Indium Tin Oxide or ITO) is coated directly onto the inner surface of the cover glass, eliminating the need for a separate touch panel layer. This integration not only reduces the overall thickness of the display assembly but also enhances durability and resistance to environmental factors.

The manufacturing process for OGS touch screens involves coating, etching, and cutting the reinforced cover glass, which can be challenging and contribute to lower yield rates. Additionally, the cutting process may introduce capillary cracks along the edges of the glass, potentially compromising its strength and durability.

Despite these challenges, OGS touchscreens offer several advantages, including improved touch sensitivity, reduced manufacturing costs (compared to traditional air bonding methods), and a sleek, integrated design. As a result, OGS touchscreens have found applications in various consumer electronics, including smartphones, tablets, and interactive displays.

Comparing the Key Attributes

To help you make an informed decision when selecting the most suitable touch screen technology for your application, let’s compare the key attributes of in-cell, on-cell, and OGS touch screen technologies:

Display Quality and Optical Performance

  • In-Cell Touchscreens: By integrating the touch sensor directly into the display panel, in-cell touchscreens offer superior optical performance and display clarity. The elimination of an additional touch panel layer results in improved light transmission and reduced reflections, enhancing readability and sunlight visibility.
  • On-Cell Touchscreens: While on-cell touchscreens offer better optical performance compared to traditional air bonding methods, they may still exhibit some thickness and color uniformity issues due to the added touch sensor layer between the color filter and polarizer.
  • OGS Touchscreens: OGS touchscreens provide excellent optical performance by eliminating the need for a separate touch panel layer. The integration of the touch sensor directly onto the cover glass results in improved light transmission and reduced reflections, similar to in-cell touchscreens.

Thickness and Form Factor

  • In-Cell Touchscreens: By eliminating the need for a separate touch panel layer, in-cell touchscreens offer the thinnest and most compact form factor among the three technologies, making them ideal for sleek and lightweight device designs.
  • On-Cell Touchscreens: While thinner than traditional air bonding methods, on-cell touchscreens may still exhibit slightly increased thickness due to the added touch sensor layer between the color filter and polarizer.
  • OGS Touchscreens: OGS touchscreens offer a relatively thin profile by integrating the touch sensor directly onto the cover glass, eliminating the need for a separate touch panel layer.

Manufacturing Complexity and Cost

  • In-Cell Touchscreens: The manufacturing process for in-cell touchscreens is highly complex, often involving specialized touch ICs and stringent quality control measures. This complexity can result in lower yield rates and higher production costs compared to other technologies.
  • On-Cell Touchscreens: On-cell touchscreens strike a balance between manufacturing complexity and cost. While not as seamlessly integrated as in-cell touchscreens, their production process is generally less complex and can offer higher yield rates, translating into lower manufacturing costs.
  • OGS Touchscreens: The manufacturing process for OGS touchscreens involves coating, etching, and cutting the reinforced cover glass, which can be challenging and contribute to lower yield rates. However, the elimination of a separate touch panel layer can result in reduced material costs compared to traditional air bonding methods.

Durability and Environmental Resistance

  • In-Cell Touchscreens: By integrating the touch sensor into the display panel, in-cell touchscreens offer enhanced durability and resistance to environmental factors, such as moisture and dust, compared to traditional air bonding methods.
  • On-Cell Touchscreens: On-cell touchscreens may exhibit slightly improved durability and environmental resistance compared to traditional air bonding methods due to the integration of the touch sensor onto the display panel.
  • OGS Touchscreens: OGS touchscreens offer superior durability and environmental resistance by integrating the touch sensor directly onto the reinforced cover glass, eliminating the need for a separate touch panel layer.

Touch Sensitivity and Performance

  • In-Cell Touchscreens: Due to the integration of the touch sensor into the display panel, in-cell touchscreens may experience increased touch sensing noise, requiring specialized touch ICs for filtering and correction. However, this integration also allows for improved touch sensitivity and responsiveness.
  • On-Cell Touchscreens: On-cell touchscreens may exhibit slightly reduced touch sensitivity compared to in-cell touchscreens due to the added touch sensor layer between the color filter and polarizer.
  • OGS Touchscreens: OGS touchscreens are known for their excellent touch sensitivity and performance, as the touch sensor is directly integrated onto the cover glass, minimizing interference and providing a seamless touch experience.
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